Man who allegedly murdered policeman in 'sex game gone wrong' and attempted to dispose of the body by dissolving it in an acid bath claims he was inspired by the TV show Breaking Bad

Posted by Karen Jones | November 1, 2016

Man who allegedly murdered policeman in 'sex game gone wrong' and attempted to dispose of the body by dissolving it in an acid bath claims he was inspired by the TV show Breaking Bad

Stefano Brizzi aged 50 is said to have strangled a policeman named PC Gordon Semple aged 59 before taking him apart.



Prosecutors accused the man of 'living out an episode' of Breaking Bad, the US TV show, in which an acid bath was used to dispose of the body.

Mr Brizzi is currently denying murder but has admitted to the obstruction of the coroners duties.

He claimed that the death occurred during a 'sex game gone wrong' that took place at his flat in south London which left him in a panic.

Crispin Ablett QC asked Mr Brizzi during cross examination about his Breaking Bad 'obsession'.

He makes the suggestions that Mr Brizzi - known to have used crystal meth in the past - could have been inspired by the TV Show in which Walter White the main character sells drugs and also attempts to dissolve someones body in an acid bath.

'I accept I considered without any rationality at all. I think I was inspired by that idea,

'I took whatever was there, thinking maybe I can dissolve him. The bath was absolutely tiny, I had no knives, no saws, anything in particular out of the ordinary.'

'I had no idea what kind of chemical I was using. I'm not saying I was not inspired by that idea. What other ways did I have to dispose of it? I couldn't bury it. I didn't know where to start.'

Officers on the scene described a 'blue-green liquid' they found in the bath as well as 'flesh-coloured globules floating in the water'.

After the death of Mr Semple, Mr Brizzi said it felt as though he was living out a 'bad dream' and decided the best option was to cut up and dispose of the body rather than calling the police.

'The condition you left the body in means the pathologist cannot tell one way or another. You could have hit him with a hammer, rendering him unconscious,' said prosecutor Crispin Ablett QC.

He added that Mr Brizzi 'did everything possibly could to make sure nobody would be able to find out what happened to Gordon Semple'.

In his reply Mr Brizzi said: 'I tried to get away with it. I did not act out a strategy of some kind of well thought ideas.'

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